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‘all that is best in

british construction”

After the Second World War, Italian line Lloyd-Triestino was faced with the unenviable task of re-building a devastated fleet. Fortunately for them, however, the immigrant trade to Australia was picking up in earnest and the Company decided to act. Three modern and comparatively sleek new cargo-liners were commissioned and built named Australia, Oceania and Neptunia. These three sister ships ushered in a new age of profitability for Lloyd-Triestino but, for their passengers, brought in a new standard of comfort at sea with space dedicated to children and a refined menu. The three sisters worked a regular and reliable service to Australia before being sold to Italia line in the early 60 thanks to the advent of commercial jet travel.

‘AUSTRALIA-CLASS’

LENGTH: 528’

BEAM: 60’2”

DRAUGHT: 26’8”

TONNAGE: 12,839 GRT

MAX SPEED: 205 KN

 
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THE DRAWING

This illustration of 'Australia' was completed over the course of two weeks in April 2019 by Michael C Brady and involved around 15 hours of drawing. Original plans and high-definition photographs were studied in order to maintain authenticity.

Dimensions: 1000mm x 370mm, 300DPI

 
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THE DETAILS

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Australia’s elegantly raked single funnel bore the Lloyd-Triestino colours.

Australia’s elegantly raked single funnel bore the Lloyd-Triestino colours.

Her lifeboats were steel and were propeller-driven.

Her lifeboats were steel and were propeller-driven.


Australia’s stern. Note the sign warning smaller vessels of the ship’s propellers which turned at speed only just below the surface.

Australia’s stern. Note the sign warning smaller vessels of the ship’s propellers which turned at speed only just below the surface.


Modest they may have been, but Australia and her sisters featured sleek bows and a modern design.

Modest they may have been, but Australia and her sisters featured sleek bows and a modern design.

 
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