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White star line

The Oriental Steam Navigation Company, colloquially known as ‘White Star Line’, dominated the Transatlantic immigrant trade for decades, engaging in a healthy rivalry with Cunard Line. With a long-standing agreement for construction of ships with the lauded Harland and Wolff works at Belfast, White Star would introduce such legendary ships as ‘Oceanic’, ‘Adriatic’, ‘Teutonic’, ‘Olympic, ‘Majestic’ and most famously of all - ‘Titanic’. After bad publicity following Titanic’s sinking and dogged by financial troubles, White Star eventually merged with Cunard in the 1930s. The final liner to wear White Star’s familiar buff and black funnel livery was MV Britannic - she would be scrapped in 1960.

 
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RMS OLYMPIC - 1911

The first of what was planned to be a major trio of luxurious liners, Olympic went on to have one of the most legendary careers of any passenger ship. This drawing depicts her on June 21, 1911; the day she first steamed into New York harbour on her Maiden Voyage.

 
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RMS TITANIC - 1912

Titanic wrested the title of world’s largest ship from her older sister Olympic but only for a brief moment; in April 1912, on her maiden voyage, she struck an iceberg and sank with enormous loss of life among her passengers and crew.

 
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HMHS BRITANNIC - 1916

Using lessons learned from Olympic and Titanic, White Star Line intended Britannic to be the absolute last word in transatlantic travel. This was never to be, however; the First World War saw Britannic’s interior fittings stripped and the liner finished as a hospital ship. She was lost in 1916 after hitting a mine off Greece.

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