RMS OLYMPIC - 1911

‘the largest steamer in the world’

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Olympic is a ship on which volumes could be written. When she first went into service she smashed size records and became world-renown for being a veritable floating palace. Indeed, the next largest ship, Cunard’s Mauretania, was about 100’ shorter and displaced around 15,000 tons less. Olympic provided a standard of luxury never before seen at sea and was the first of what White Star Line planned to be a trio of outstanding vessels. Tragically, this was never to be the case; both of Olympic’s sisters were lost and she would go on to serve a somewhat awkward role in White Star Line’s fleet - a reminder of what could have been.

This drawing depicts Olympic exactly as she appeared on June 21, sailing into New York Harbour for the first time on her maiden voyage.

‘Olympic-Class’ Liner

Length: 882’6”

Beam: 92’9”

Draught: 34’7”

Tonnage: 45,324 GRT

Max Speed: 24 kn

 
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THE DRAWING

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This illustration of 'Olympic' was completed over the course of two weeks in November 2018 by Michael C Brady and involved around 30 hours of drawing. Original plans and high-definition photographs were studied in order to maintain authenticity and special thanks is owed researchers Bruce Beveridge and David Cotgreave their invaluable work in regards to the Olympic Class..

Dimensions: 1627mm x 5902mm, 300DPI

Olympic’s bridge and forward promenade. One of the easiest ways to tell Olympic from her sisters is the fully-open promenade deck; this was never enclosed, unlike on Titanic and Britannic.

Olympic’s bridge and forward promenade. One of the easiest ways to tell Olympic from her sisters is the fully-open promenade deck; this was never enclosed, unlike on Titanic and Britannic.

Two of Olympic’s massive propellers and her gigantic rudder. The central propeller was made of cast bronze while the two outer ones comprised of a hub with three blades; Olympic lost one of these blades mid-Atlantic and Titanic’s completion was delayed in order to use one of her blades as replacement.

Two of Olympic’s massive propellers and her gigantic rudder. The central propeller was made of cast bronze while the two outer ones comprised of a hub with three blades; Olympic lost one of these blades mid-Atlantic and Titanic’s completion was delayed in order to use one of her blades as replacement.

On June 21 1911, Olympic sailed triumphantly into New York Harbour for the first time. All along her hull, windows were open to take in the sights. Two of the large gangway doors on B-Deck were open to prepare to disembark passengers eager to land in America.

On June 21 1911, Olympic sailed triumphantly into New York Harbour for the first time. All along her hull, windows were open to take in the sights. Two of the large gangway doors on B-Deck were open to prepare to disembark passengers eager to land in America.

Olympic’s cranes were prepared to quickly unload cargo too; photographs shows them in a position of readiness on that sunny day in June.

Olympic’s cranes were prepared to quickly unload cargo too; photographs shows them in a position of readiness on that sunny day in June.

 
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