HULL 401 - TITANIC

Launch Day - May 31, 1911

‘the largest and most luxurious in the world’


83b0ef48-ffd7-4e75-b2c9-67d2bd42ca40.jpg

Quite possibly the most famous liner ever built, RMS Titanic was the second in a trio of 'Olympic'-class ships constructed for the White Star Line from 1909-1915. At the time of her launch, Titanic claimed the title for the largest ship in the world and boasted a standard of luxury never before seen at sea.

This drawing depicts Titanic on May 31 1911 - the day she first floated free from the giant slipway at Harland and Wolff in Belfast.

‘Olympic-Class’ Liner

Length: 882’6”

Beam: 92’9”

Draught: 34’7”

Tonnage: 45,324 GRT

Max Speed: 24 kn

 
WSL.png

THE DRAWING

TITA11.png

This illustration of 'Titanic' was completed over the course of four weeks from April to May 2018, then modified in December 2018, by Michael C Brady and involved around 100 hours of drawing. Original plans and high-definition photographs were studied in order to maintain authenticity and special thanks is owed researchers Bruce Beveridge and David Cotgreave for their invaluable work in regards to the Olympic Class.

Titanic was launched with a window and sidelight arrangement virtually unchanged from that of her older sister Olympic. During fit-out many changes would eventually be made to Titanic.

Titanic was launched with a window and sidelight arrangement virtually unchanged from that of her older sister Olympic. During fit-out many changes would eventually be made to Titanic.

The flag flown on the day of Olympic and Titanic's launches is up for debate, although a photo of Runic launched in 1900 seems to show a flag with the word 'LAUNCH' embroidered on it.

The flag flown on the day of Olympic and Titanic's launches is up for debate, although a photo of Runic launched in 1900 seems to show a flag with the word 'LAUNCH' embroidered on it.

Titanic's aft promenade area. The chimneys are, presumably, from some temporary boilers or furnaces positioned on the well-deck during construction. Also note the fenders strung out over the side of the well-deck.

Titanic's aft promenade area. The chimneys are, presumably, from some temporary boilers or furnaces positioned on the well-deck during construction. Also note the fenders strung out over the side of the well-deck.

The forward well-deck. More boilers/furnaces were positioned here. Also note the unfinished bridge area.

The forward well-deck. More boilers/furnaces were positioned here. Also note the unfinished bridge area.

 
WSL.png

featured titanic products